Visit our new blog

August 17, 2009

We have a new home for our blog! This blog will no longer be updated with new posts.

To read current posts, please visit our new blog located at http://www.americanrepertorytheater.org/blog.

Sign up for an RSS feed of our new blog at http://www.americanrepertorytheater.org/inside/blog/feed.

Thanks for reading!


Aurélia’s Oratorio returns!

July 6, 2009

Aurélia’s Oratorio is coming back! This show played to sold-out houses this winter, so if you weren’t able to get a ticket then, now is your chance. Aurélia will be back at the Loeb for just two weeks, July 22 – August 2.

Read reviews of the show this winter from the Boston Globe, Boston Herald, and Boston Metro — or peruse audience members’ responses.

Here is a repost of the two-minute trailer that gives you a glimpse into the magic of Aurélia’s enchanting topsy-turvy world. Learn more on our website.


A fabulous “Best of Both Worlds” workshop

June 18, 2009

Several of us from the A.R.T. trekked down to the big apple yesterday for the presentation at the end of a one-week workshop kindly hosted by the folks at The Public Theater.  The cast – which all of us present hope will be the one that will come to Cambridge – was assembled in front of their scores, with a pianist and a conductor.  Diane made a brief speech, and the music began…. and WHAT a ride it was!  The cast was phenomenal, voices ranging from the big handsome Philip Boykin singing the role of the King with the deepest bass baritone voice to the absolutely adorable 12-year old Chris Borger, who not only sounds like an angel, but performed with the poise and the self-assurance of a total pro.  And the amazing Lavon Fisher-Wilson, who brought the house down with her “let a little sunshine in”…. we were practically dancing in the aisles.  And… last but not least, there was “Big Daddy” himself, David Alan Grier, a sort of master of ceremonies, story teller, who tied all the proceedings together with a great sense of humor and improvisation.  I was not familiar with the music of composer Deirdre Murray, but I could not sit still, totally enveloped in the rhythm, the buoyancy and enthusiasm of the cast, and those voices!!!! I cant wait for rehearsals to begin here in Cambridge in the fall…

cast assembled

cast assembled

Jeanette Bayardelle struts her stuff

Jeanette Bayardelle struts her stuff

little Chris Borger enchants

little Chris Borger enchants

Big Daddy himself, David Alan Grier

Big Daddy himself, David Alan Grier

Lavon Fisher-Wilson lets a little sunshine in....

Lavon Fisher-Wilson lets a little sunshine in....

the cast

the cast


The Duck Variations

June 9, 2009

Sexual Perversity in Chicago and The Duck Variations — a David Mamet double bill — start Thursday!

Here’s a clip of rehearsal footage from

The Duck Variations
by David Mamet
directed by Marcus Stern
featuring Thomas Derrah and Will LeBow

Learn more


Behind the scenes of Romance at the A.R.T. – May 13, 2009

May 15, 2009

Production dramaturg Sean Bartley takes viewers behind the scenes of the rehearsal process for Romance at the A.R.T.

May 13, 2009

View Sean Bartley’s Behind the Scenes video from May 14, 2009.


Behind the scenes of Romance at the A.R.T. – May 14, 2009

May 15, 2009

Production dramaturg Sean Bartley takes viewers behind the scenes of the rehearsal process for Romance at the A.R.T.

May 14, 2009

View Sean Bartley’s Behind the Scenes video from May 13, 2009.


A Laughable Tech

May 13, 2009

Tuesday, May 5, 2009:

I’m writing from the first night of tech rehearsal. Sitting inside rehearsal rooms for the past few weeks, I had no concept of just how enormous the scale of our production is. Mamet’s plays are typically performed on unit sets with simple lighting instruments, set pieces, and props. Our version of Romance uses a string of giant moving set pieces, gyroscoping lights, stage blood, and smoke machines. At first glance, this gear is better suited to a rock concert than a Mamet play.

But once we began running sequences from the show, I realized just how well the massive scale of our productions meshes with the ambitions of Mamet’s text. The A.R.T. is known for Mamet works like Oleanna, a realistic, two-character piece that takes place in a tiny office. But Romance is a larger-than-life farce. Actors throw roasting pans and insults across the courtroom with reckless abandon. We’ve thrown in plenty of tricks, zany sound effects, and even a strip-tease or two.

Scott’s staging also takes advantage of one of the text’s greatest strengths: a great sense of farcical acceleration. At first glance, the play’s opening scene is nearly free of farce. It could easily be a scene from this week’s episode of Law and Order. Slowly but surely, Mamet tightens the screws. Polite disagreement turns into schoolyard name-calling. A wisecracking judge becomes a pill-popping maniac. An ordered courtroom descends into comic chaos.


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