Catch-Up Ball

May 15, 2007

Bullet points today, ‘cause that’s how my brain is frying…

  • Previews! Oh, what a pleasure to have an audience! Truly the missing link. The energy of the house, my nerves, the drive and purpose – all marvelous. And the energy tightened the performance so much! A challenge, always, to make that leap from the crew in the room to EVERYONE in the room, but the best challenge, and, after all, the purpose of the exercise. If no one ever saw the play, what would be the point? I wouldn’t do it. The PURPOSE of a piece of theater is the AUDIENCE. So, thank you for the challenge and the reward – come early and often! I think you’ll enjoy it, and get a lot out of it; your money’s worth, I hope. Read the rest of this entry »
Advertisements

Moving to the Loeb

May 10, 2007

On Sunday we bid farewell to our rehearsal hall, and yesterday began our technical rehearsals in the Loeb. The set is wonderful: the room looks cavernous and invokes that particularly English antique grandeur of high-vaulted wood paneling and leather, but by using levels and angles and furniture our designer, Michael Griggs, has created a variety of playing spaces within the grand room that allow for intimate and specific contact between actors. It’s very well done, and a pleasure to play on. Read the rest of this entry »


a metaphor is like a simile…

May 3, 2007

I’m just back in from my morning run, and dreaming of Marathons. I haven’t run one yet, but I’m hatching plans to race next fall.

Toronto Waterfront, September 30th. The timing is perfect for me.

Those who know me well know that I thrive on metaphor. Most of my theory of acting is that being on stage is just like snowboarding. But, as I prepare to go back out and develop my career in the theatre, running reminds me that endurance is not struggle, but commitment.

-henry david clarke


transporting and roundabouts…

May 2, 2007

We’re running the show just about every day in the rehearsal hall now, and I’m learning a lot. There are some sections that are still rough, but other places where we’re fine tuning, and that’s very exciting – you can really feel a PLAY happening. And yesterday we had a costume parade – everyone trying on costumes and milling around to see how we all look together. David Reynoso has done a terrific job of designing costumes that look fabulous, place us immediately in England, and are good to act in. I’ve got these bell bottoms and a pair of snakeskin shoes that instantly transport me back in time. I was born in 1976 – the year after this play premiered – so it’s especially fun for me to imagine. Read the rest of this entry »


Exactly Wrong – what fun!

April 27, 2007

Well, this is the right time in the rehearsal process to realize that everything I’m doing is wrong! In fact, it’s so EXACTLY wrong that all I really have to do is the opposite of what I’m doing, and I’m suddenly in business!

These last few days have been big rehearsals for me. After a whirlwind trip to New York City for our final Showcase performances, I was back in deep on Wednesday, and failing. Failing in interesting and informative ways, but bombing none the less. I was not aiding the play or telling the story. So, I set about trying to fix that. Read the rest of this entry »


Living out of a suitcase and Spilling Ink

April 22, 2007

First, I was disturbed and intrigued to hear of the violation of Mike Daisey’s work. A troubling and violent event in a community of artists; I wish him the bravery to remain open as he continues to perform.

I’ve been living out of a suitcase for the last two years. My wife and I live in Vermont, I’m a full-time student in Cambridge. I go back and forth a lot. I spent three months in Moscow. I’ve become an excellent bag packer, but I do not excel at unpacking. Read the rest of this entry »


Delays, tuna packets, and snake skin

April 21, 2007

Wednesday April 18, 2007

Missed my direct flight! Showcase performances went well, but leaving took longer than I had anticipated and I was late to the airport. Never missed a flight before.

The ticket person was very kind. I got to the front of the line and he said “how are you?” and I said “honestly, I’m struggling.” He re-routed me for free, but I had to go through Chicago. I flew from L.A. to O’Hare in the bulkhead seat, so I couldn’t extend my legs and the engine was in my ear. Then an early-morning lay-over in Chicago, and finally to Logan at 10:30. A good man in Los Angeles gave me several of those foil-packed tuna portions for my flight, and they proved a welcome breakfast in Chicago. Thanks, Ross! Read the rest of this entry »